Utah and the Great War


The Beehive State and the World War I Experience

In time for the centennial of the United States’s entry into World War I, this collection of seventeen essays explores the war experience in Utah through multiple perspectives, from those of soldiers, nurses and ambulance drivers who experienced the horror of the conflict firsthand to those on the home front who were transformed by the war. Citizens supported the war financially, through service on councils
of defense, with victory gardens, and by other means. Some of Utah’s Native Americans and at least one Episcopal bishop resisted the war. The terrible 1918–1919 flu pandemic impacted Utah and killed more victims around the world than those who died on the battlefields. There was a Red Scare and fight over United States participation in a League of Nations. These topics and more are explored, helping us understand the nature and complexity of the conflict and its impact on Utahns. 

In time for the centennial of the United States’s entry into World War I, this collection of seventeen essays explores the war experience in Utah through multiple perspectives, from those of soldiers, nurses and ambulance drivers who experienced the horror of the conflict firsthand to those on the home front who were transformed by the war. Citizens supported the war financially, through service on councils
of defense, with victory gardens, and by other means. Some of Utah’s Native Americans and at least one Episcopal bishop resisted the war. The terrible 1918–1919 flu pandemic impacted Utah and killed more victims around the world than those who died on the battlefields. There was a Red Scare and fight over United States participation in a League of Nations. These topics and more are explored, helping us understand the nature and complexity of the conflict and its impact on Utahns. 


Allan Kent Powell retired in 2013 as managing editor of the Utah Historical Quarterly and as senior state historian at the Utah State Historical Society. 


Praise and Reviews:

“It is very significant to have these articles collected into one publication now that the centennial of World War I is here. It is especially important in helping us to remember that history repeats itself and that we have been through the same emotions in the past that we are going through today.”
—Robert S. Voyles, director of the Fort Douglas Military Museum 


“A well-organized collection of articles that progress from the state’s military contributions to the Great War through political, protest, and health activities to the aftermath. Relevant to both scholars and general readers, this book is multidimensional.”
—Walter Jones, author of The Sand Bar: A History of Casper, Wyoming’s Controversial Lowlands