Tony Hillerman’s Navajoland


Hideouts, Haunts, and Havens in the Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee Mysteries

Tony Hillerman is beloved for his novels of intrigue in the American Southwest. In Tony Hillerman’s Navajoland, Laurance Linford takes readers on a journey through the Four Corners region to the haunts of Hillerman’s characters. Offered in encyclopedic form, each entry gives the common name of a particular location, the Navajo name and history, and a description of the location’s significance in various Hillerman novels. An understanding of the Navajo names and their relations to the landscape will lend a new dimension to the characters and events Tony Hillerman created.

This expanded third edition is updated to include all 72 sites from Hillerman’s final and location-rich novel, The Shape Shifter.

Tony Hillerman is beloved for his novels of intrigue in the American Southwest. In Tony Hillerman’s Navajoland, Laurance Linford takes readers on a journey through the Four Corners region to the haunts of Hillerman’s characters. Offered in encyclopedic form, each entry gives the common name of a particular location, the Navajo name and history, and a description of the location’s significance in various Hillerman novels. An understanding of the Navajo names and their relations to the landscape will lend a new dimension to the characters and events Tony Hillerman created.

This expanded third edition is updated to include all 72 sites from Hillerman’s final and location-rich novel, The Shape Shifter.

Laurance D. Linford was trained as an archaeologist. Formerly executive director of the Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial Association in Gallup, New Mexico, he is now an administrator for the Gallup-McKinley County Public Schools. Linford is also the author of Navajo Places: History, Legend, Landscape (University of Utah Press, 2000).


Praise and Reviews:

“An invaluable guide. This book belongs in the car of any traveler passing through this land.”—New Mexico Magazine


"An entertaining place-name guide to the traditional homelands of the Navajo people."—The Indian Trader